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Amey waste management
Topic posted by Pasco ... dated:11 March 2016
.Thoughts on Amey waste collectors, I have made several complaints to Trafford Council including Sean Anstee with no success, something needs to be done as it's not on for residents of Trafford.
Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Xdcam ... dated:05 December 2019
Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Herb ... dated:02 August 2016

I think Trafford's system of bins is the best in the counrty & I have never had any problems with them. Mind you I have lived in 3 differnt houses over the past 10 years & they have all been Friday collections, so maybe it is the Friday crews that are the best. Mind you we are opposite a road that has Thursday collections & they seem to be as good.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by AnotherPete ... dated:02 August 2016

No problem at all with our bins - think the comments about flies, vermin and foxes were scaremongering, which I suspected they were at the time.  Our grey bin is usually pretty full when it is emptied, but there's usually still enough room in there, and our blue & black bins are normally about half full when they're collected.  Of those, the blue is usually the fullest because of leaflets that get pushed through the door, packaging from parcels etc but I always flatten or shred this.  The green bin varies for us, sometimes three or four of the caddy bags in there, but if I've cut the grass or done some other gardening it's often completely full.  No flies, vermin, foxes, or bad smells from any of them though.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Graz ... dated:01 August 2016

Do you remember the uproar when the grey bins went to a twice weekly collection? Anybody still think it was the wrong idea or has it helped you cut down on non-recyclable waste? Did the swarms of flies and rats ever appear or did I miss them? I just wish the blue and black bins were bigger or collected more frequently.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by AnotherPete ... dated:01 August 2016
What has any of this got to do with Amey waste management? Really?
Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Tom ... dated:01 August 2016

> Making sharp right-angled corners would actually increase the danger for pedestrians.

Absolute rubbish, for reasons I've already explained.  The vast majority of vehicles using such junctions are cars, and they do not need to swing wide to take a tight corner.

> Firstly a car turning in would probably not reduce its speed but instead tend to take a wider sweep having left the main road so encroaching on the opposite side of the side road. 

"Hmmm, I don't want to slow down for this corner so I think I'll just drive head on into oncoming traffic".  Yes, I'm sure these are the kinds of motorists we want on the roads?

The greater danger would be from a long vehicle turning in to the left from the main road. Long vehicles tend to cut in on curves. Nothing to do with the standard of driving, it is just the laws of geometry.

I bet about one LGV a week uses such junctions.  If they can't use them safely then it's up to the authorities to ensure they have a banksman to take care of such matters.  We shouldn't accept that vehicles with such major design flaws have a right to use the roads.

> If the driver of the long vehicle is unable to see them there is a real danger of them being crushed as the vehicle cuts in on the corner.

So mandate that such vehicles have no blind spots.  In this day and age, it's an easy thing to do.  And if it can't be done by design or electronic assistance, then employ a banksman.

> There are places around here where long vehicles regularly mount the kerbs because of the combination of length and the sharpness of the corner. The 245 bus regularly mounts the kerb turning left into Moorside Road, likewise the 15 when turning left into Broadway or right into Lytham Road. Then hospital delivery vehicles often either hit the kerb or mount the central reservation when turning left from Bowers Avenue into Moorside Road. 

I think you'll find that if you make the kerb two feet tall, they will stop hitting it.  There's no excuse for poor or lazy driving.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Edward ... dated:31 July 2016

There's nowt wrong with Shawe Hall junction. Making sharp right-angled corners would actually increase the danger for pedestrians.

Firstly a car turning in would probably not reduce its speed but instead tend to take a wider sweep having left the main road so encroaching on the opposite side of the side road.

The greater danger would be from a long vehicle turning in to the left from the main road. Long vehicles tend to cut in on curves. Nothing to do with the standard of driving, it is just the laws of geometry.

To avoid mounting the kerb with its rear nearside wheel(s) and running over a pedestrian's foot or squashing a pram a long vehicle is forced to make a wide swan-neck turn. By having to move well out to the right before commencing a left turn opens up a wide gap on the nearside between the footpath and the vehicle. Many times, in spite of the long vehicle signalling left, a car driver or (motor)cyclist has attempted to overtake on the inside. If the driver of the long vehicle is unable to see them there is a real danger of them being crushed as the vehicle cuts in on the corner. A few years ago, not very far from here, a cyclist was killed attempting just such an action. On a rigid vehicle it is possible to maintain a mirror check close along the nearside whilst negotiating the corner but with an artic or a wagon and drawbar trailer once the drawing unit commences to turn in relation to the trailer it is impossible for the driver to see what is alongside the trailer. No amount of mirrors can entirely compensate for the blindsiding effect. The trouble is many motorists and riders do not realise what is happening and the danger they are placing themselves in until it is too late.

There are places around here where long vehicles regularly mount the kerbs because of the combination of length and the sharpness of the corner. The 245 bus regularly mounts the kerb turning left into Moorside Road, likewise the 15 when turning left into Broadway or right into Lytham Road. Then hospital delivery vehicles often either hit the kerb or mount the central reservation when turning left from Bowers Avenue into Moorside Road.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Divad ... dated:31 July 2016

I am sure Amey find these comments of great value. 
Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Tom ... dated:30 July 2016

In many other European countries, pedestrians on the pavement have priority at side roads - vehicles wishing to cross their path have to wait, even if the pedestrian hasn't stepped into the road.  After all, the footway is a part of the highway - why should a pedestrian travelling east stop so that someone on the carriageway also travelling east can turn north across their path?  On a motorway you wouldn't expect vehicles in lane one to give way to vehicles in lane two as they attempted to take the slip road, so why do we accept that pedestrians have to do this?

There's a bit problem in this and other areas, with roads designed in the 1960s so that traffic can maintain its high speed when turning onto side roads.  You can see it, huge sweeping bends like this:

https://goo.gl/maps/MxV51DKLsc92

Junctions like that need to be re-engineered so the corners are tighter.  It'd slow traffic using the junction, and it'd also reduce the amount of time that pedestrians need to be in the road.  Motorists would also be at a right angle to the major road when waiting to join, so they'd have a better view of oncoming traffic. Safer for everyone.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Graz ... dated:30 July 2016

Those scenarios assume the pedestrian is in control of their actions. A driver should always act in a way that they are able to avoid unforseen circumstances, such as someone trippping or falling backwards (this is why you are not meant to drive across a pedestrian crossing until it is completely clear). Clearing your path ahead by getting pedestrians to wait until you have turned is poor driving and it gives the driver a false impression that their route is clear when an unexpected event could easily happen (children, animals, mobility scooters). 

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by SteveW ... dated:30 July 2016
I forgot to add. A pedestrian starting to cross as an indicating vehicle is close to the turn is little different to stepping out into moving traffic on a main road - a bad idea.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by SteveW ... dated:30 July 2016

Could the binmen simply be warning the pedestrian that they are about to turn, before the pedestrian has begun to do so. Although there is an obligation to give way to a pedestrian who is already crossing, there is also a, prehaps unwritten, obligation for a pedestrian not to start crossing when someone is already indicating to pull in - due to the increased danger and traffic disruption of stopping a vehicle at a side road where following traffic is not expecting it - particularly for a large vehicle that will block the view of the pedestrian for following traffic.

Similarly, when I am a pedestrian, I will put my foot onto a zebra to stop the traffic, but I will not do so when traffic is already close enough that they would have to brake hard to stop or if there is no traffic behind them.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Oscar ... dated:29 July 2016

Caught an ASDA delivery van on dash cam flying down the bus lane on the East Lancs the other day whilst all the other less important people queued like lemmings.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Divad ... dated:29 July 2016

That would be a matter for the police really and not so much Amey. Their small grass cutting tractors are regular speeders as are the road sweepers as the flit from one place to another. It is surprising none ever seem to get caught at it.
Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Dave - urmston.net ... dated:29 July 2016

In the past few weeks I’ve twice seen the dustbin men speeding through Urmston. On the first occasion they beeped to warn pedestrians who were about to cross a road, not to start crossing as they were approaching the same road at speed and were about to make a left turn into it. What's that all about?

The Highway Code obligates drivers to give way to pedestrians who are already crossing the road that they are turning into. So let me clarify… they're proceeding down the road - at speed, they want to make a left turn – at speed, so as they’re approaching that road they’re beeping those pedestrians who are about to cross it to make them aware that they’re about to turn into that road at speed so that they don’t have to stop to give way to the pedestrians.

It's an offence to sound a horn aggressively and as the driver of the vehicle has no legal right to stop people from crossing the road that they want to turn into, my view is that he is not beeping the horn as a warning but as an aggressive manoeuvre designed to justify taking the corner at speed. In other words, he could reasonably beep the horn if someone was about to step out in front of him but not if that person has started to cross the road that they're turning into because it’s the pedestrian’s right of way.

Someone needs to have a word with the driver as it's an accident waiting to happen; just because they want to get their job done as fast as possible.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Edward ... dated:14 July 2016

Over a year ago I reported a tree whose roots were lifting the road surface, creating a hump which prevents rainwater draining away. This causes a very large puddle to form across the mouth of a side road, just where pedestrians need to cross. The council sent a gang round who retarmaced the footpath behind the tree but left the hump in the road.

Many of the street drains are completely silted up causing the road to flood to kerb level. Passing vehicles create a bow wave, soaking any unfortunate pedestrian who happens to be in range. (Photograph in the gallery). Despite being reported it is obvious that the drains have not had any attention for a very long time. A councillor told me that the streets are swept every eight weeks but how often does the plunger lorry do the rounds?

I am not sure if this is on the correct thread, if not please feel free to move it to somewhere more appropriate relating to TBC's services.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Tom ... dated:13 July 2016

I reported that dip near the police station many months ago.  I'm sure the council look at these things with a view to the impact on vehicles with four wheels.  They don't consider that a motorcyclist might go over that at 30mph and be thrown from the saddle.  It's almost completely invisible at night.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Brian2 ... dated:13 July 2016

I reported this on the TMBC website a few weeks ago . At the same time I reported that the trees were overgrowing onto Church Road from William Wroe golf course. The trees were chopped back within the week. Very roughly I  think. However the path was completely ignored and is now impassable.

The problem here is that if left too long then a minor maintence job becomes a major problem that will cost much more.

And don't get me started on the crumbling roads. Flixton Road from Princess Road towards Urmston is in a shocking state. There is also a dip in Church Road on the approach to the old Police station that is sagging deeper. I can foresee this dip being ignored until it collapses and then the road will be shut for ages.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Divad ... dated:13 July 2016

The Urmston Local History Society recieved a complaint regarding the state of the Bottoms footpath. As this path warrented a Blue Plaque status it is important for our district. Neglect in maintaining the access has been on going for some time and so a complaint has been lodged with Amey to attend to this problem. Futhermore, the same advice has been forwarded to the Trafford Council. I am posting this to inform all of these events so it can be monitored over the coming weeks as to the responce.
Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Angiesluck ... dated:17 June 2016

It is true, they do tend to leave them in the middle of the footpath especially on Broadway. I do my exercise walk down there nearly every day and on bin days I have to move several out of the way to get past so would be very annoying for people with pushchairs or in wheelchairs. They should be told to replace back onto edge of people's gardens as it is just lazyness on their part cos, as soon as they have finished their rounds they get to go home so they obviously rushing their jobs

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Herb ... dated:14 April 2016

When I lived on the Wimpey estate in Davyhulme I had two neighbours that had very large hedges & I used to let them both fill my green bin & there were a lot of the other neighbours also allowed their green bin to be used

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Divad ... dated:12 April 2016

Not really Graz, where I am there are five flats using collective bins. It makes sense to place garbage in the minimum amount of bins, if one is full we move onto another. In your case, it means theirs has reached capacity. You should complain to your neighbour if they don't leave enough room for your own deposits.
Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Graz ... dated:12 April 2016

If you found out one of your neighbours regularly used any remaining space in your bin for their rubbish would you be bothered?

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by SteveW ... dated:13 March 2016

We place our bins on a concrete manhole cover in the grass verge for collection, but they are often returned to the middle of the footpath, blocking the way for pedestrians and in front of our driveway forcing us to park elsewhere and move the bin before being able to access our driveway. The worst case was a bin being left in that position, while I was sat in the car, with the engine running, obviously about to drive out!

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Aardvark ... dated:13 March 2016

Our street sees the binmen on Fridays and they always put the bins back against the garden walls, on the footpath. I've got no complaints about them at all; I think they do a grand job.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Edward ... dated:12 March 2016

The gang emptying the grey / black / blue bins always put the emptied bin back on my drive but the green team tend to leave it on the footpath in the middle of my gateway.

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Pasco ... dated:12 March 2016

I should have worded it better, I don't mean the emptying of waste bins I mean where they leave bins when they have been emptied, they tend to leave them in the middle of the footpath on a main road causing obstruction, blocking the pavement for parents pushing prams  and walking children to school etc. I have also walked out of my house and walked into the bin as Amey have not put the bins back where they belong. 

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Herb ... dated:11 March 2016

I agree with Divad, which is not usual in present times, but over the past 10 years I have lived in 3 different houses & we have never had any problems with bin collections. Mind you all 3 are/was Friday collections

Re: Amey waste management
Reply posted by Divad ... dated:11 March 2016

So far, touch wood, there hasn't been any problem where I live. Right down to the individual that empties the little bins, Paul, he is doing a fine job generally in Urmston Center.
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